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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
are getting a little fed up. jim axelrod is there tonight. jim. >> reporter: well, scott, this water-filled tunnel behind me is just one of the many challenges sandy has left for new yorkers who are facing a transportation nightmare. on this road into new york city, gasoline may be hard to find, but frustration summer is not. >> get in front of me! get in front of me! if it makes you happy. >> reporter: supply isn't the problem. it's the power blackouts that are keeping pumps from operating. >> move it! move it! >> reporter: aaa says just a third of stations are open in new jersey and long island. this line was three hours long. >> worth the wait. >> reporter: hours waiting for gas is followed by hours to get over a bridge or through a tunnel. to reduce congestion, police are turning away cars with less than three people until midnight tomorrow. >> move the line to the front! let's go! >> reporter: new york city buses resumed running today, and they were crammed tight. cedric taylor is a security guard headed back to work. >> you have to be patient because they're slowly trying to re
west, jim aelrod is in downtown maattan at t tip of m a what's tt there? >> reporter: anthousny, j with the last hour the rain has startedo intensify, the wind has picked up. you can hear a sound as the wind whips through the skyscrapers of lower manhattan that sound like a jet engine and it seems as though new york is really about to feel the full force of hurricane sandy. the big concern is the water right over my shoulder. all eyes are on the sea wall. if that water comes up over the sea wall and works its way into the electricity generating equipment that's in lower manhattan and into the subway stations in lower manhattan there could be very serious implications. anthony? >> mason: jim axelrod, thanks, jim. that was dramatic rescue at sea aboard a ship you may recognize from the movies. and two presidential campaigns are derailed by a hurricane. that's ju,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >> mason: the hurricane forced the presidential candidates to suspend their campaigning for a couple days. john dickerson is our political director. john, with just a week until election day, how is this going t
help your family. >> pelley: reports from jim axelrod, anna werner and seth doane. anemployment rises. the economy creates more jobs, but not enough. anthony mason on the final economic report before the election. >> we're four days away from a fresh start. h we made real progress these past four years. >> reporter: a campaign 2012 report from bob schieffer. and "on the road." steve hartman with children of the storm. silver linings in a dark week. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pel >> pelley: good evening. 110. that's the new death toll from hurricane sandy, and it's not likely to stop there. bodies are being found today in homes as rescue workers reach into the hardest-hit areas. the pictures that struck us today were of just one family in staten island, new york. 14-year-old kate at her grandparent's house. her mother, julie, trying to pull something recognizable from the rubble. and sheila and dominick trayna holding on to their memories and contemplating the future. the insurance industry es
returning, and jim axelrod takes us down under. >> reporter: where are we? >> we're down here at the main exit and entrance of south ferry terminal. >> reporter: joe leader of m.t.a. transportation took us down for a look at the hardest hit of all 468 new york city subway stations. south ferry, at the southern tip of manhattan. >> we had barricaded up top with wood plywood and sandbags to keep the water out, but when the surge came, it brought down all this material that doesn't belong here. large pieces of lumber, and that broke through the barrier and allowed more water to come in. >> reporter: that's water just a few steps down from the top of the steps. but the tracks are another two levels underneath that. so as much as the water's gone down, we're still two levels worth of water till we get to the tracks? >> absolutely. >> reporter: it will take a week alone just to pump out the water. but the subway system will begin limited service tomorrow. limited mass transit has left city streets choked with cars, a telling sign of just how badly the city needs to ease the stress on the roads.
an explosion at a con-edison electrical substation. a quarter of a million homes and businesses lost power. jim axelrod reports the trouble was just beginning. >> reporter: workers are now taking down the boards that were supposed to keep water out of subway stations and loading sandbags back on to the truck. having done their best in a battle they could have never won. there was no way to prepare that would have kept the water out? >> no, no. no way. how are you going to stop water? water does what it wants to do. >> reporter: seven tunnels linking manhattan to brooklyn and queens are flooded. the signals, switches and third rails are covered with sludge. m.t.a. workman john o'neil went down for a look in the south ferry station and reported back. >> it's probably up to the two poles from the top. full to the top. forget about it. >> reporter: even after the water has gone away, 6,200 subway cars must be inspected along with 600 miles of track and 468 subway stations. >> the m.t.a. last night faced a disaster as devastating at it has ever faced. >> reporter: joe loda is chairman of the metropo
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)